Saddle: Since cultural immersion is an important component of all of our trips, we use the same saddles and tack that are used year-round on our livestock ranches. The local ranchers in our area are used to spending long days in the saddle and can find themselves outside for days at time during round-up season.

The Chilean saddle reflects the needs of the rider, offering enough control of the horse over very steep terrain and comfortable enough to be able to ride for days at a time. Parts of the saddle may also serve as bedroll when we are out on the trail.

The Chilean saddle most closely resembles the American McClellan military type saddle. Most are metal framed and layered beneath with blankets that can serve as bedrolls. They are covered with layers of sheepskin on top to afford the rider comfort.

Stirrup: The traditional Chilean stirrup is carved from wood to enclose and shield the foot; and shaped like a shoe in the interior. Protection of the foot is its primary aim, both in the livestock corrals as well as on narrow mountain trails. Because the stirrup is enclosed, it also avoids entanglement in the brush, which is prolific in Northern Patagonia.  The stirrups are usually mounted more forward and higher on the saddle than the typical American trail riding saddle, which takes some time to become accustomed to.

For our trips, use the classic Chilean saddle, suitable and very comfortable for long distances. The Chilean saddle is very similar to the western saddle, but does not have the horn, since the loop is tied at the back of the right side. This type of mount is used by the huasos in the Chilean rodeo. The Chilean saddle, like the western, has two straps that are used to secure it against the pull of cattle.

Leggings: Patagonia sheepskin leggings, along with the boina cap are iconic of the Gauchos of Argentina and Huasos of Chile. These leggings are handmade, by the locals from local sheep skin or tanned goat hide. These are practically essential garments to shield the hauso from the cold and rain of Patagonia.

Poncho & Hat: To protect the torso, as a tradition, a blanket is used: woven with natural wool on a loom, the poncho covers the entire upper part of the body. The Chilean huaso of Patagonia typically wears a beret on the head, known as a boina. The other type of hat encountered in Patagonia is the Guacho hat, which resembles the Western Stetson. what hat you wear in Patagonia has a special significance, because it signifies the cultural background and tradition of the wearer.

Our Activities

Single Day Program
Our guests will spend a day getting to know the horses, they will learn how to treat them, so that rider and horse can bond and function in a self-sufficient way. This method is known as “rational dressage” where horse and rider form a working relationship based on mutual understanding, respect and friendship, and then harvest vegetables in our garden for a farewell dinner with the family …
Two-Day Outing
During two days our guests will meet the horses, they will learn how to treat them, so that rider and horse can bond. This method is known as “rational dressage” where horse and rider form a working relationship based on mutual understanding, respect and friendship and then apply what they have learned riding through the Futaleufú valley ….
Espolón Valley Odyssey
For more experienced riders and outdoor enthusiasts, we offer a five-day trip through the remote and spectacular Espolón Valley. The valley is located in the heart of the Andes of Northern Patagonia and is surrounded by snow-capped mountains and glaciers. During the trip we will cross numerous rivers and lakes exploring virgin native forests and pristine landscapes …